DA Confusion for the 22nd of March, 2019

Sort out your confusions here while I’m in Athens. Ευτυχώς, όταν όλα είναι Ελληνικά σε μένα, τα καταλαβαίνω. Enjoy the fun and get your confusions sorted.

60 thoughts on “DA Confusion for the 22nd of March, 2019

  1. Being a pharmacologist, I got 9D straight away. No help in deciphering any of the 18 yet … except perhaps 23A (is it one?)

    Very taken with 7D … the answer was an answer in the very first cryptic I ever tackled in about 1971 … “Sounds like a deportation order for a pair of Seth Efricans”.

  2. Just beginning — first one in 13d. I’m hoping after working out 9d that today’s experience will be pretty painless. Is “blackjack” supposed to be an anagrind?!

  3. GeoffL – yes, 23a is one of the 18, as are 12a, 26a, 18d and 24d. I got 18d after guessing the answer and working backwards – the rest of the 18 follow a similar wordplay.

  4. All done. I did like the theme for today. I worked out the theme from other clues, but it took me a while to actually get 9d.

    7d was first in and 2d was last. Had a few like 2d and 19a where I had to build the word as I hadn’t heard of them before.

  5. Ray, is the blackjack reference to shuffling, or does it have a different meaning? Got to admit this threw me off, for a while, as an indicator. When I finally got 9d, in relation to the theme, I really liked the reference.

  6. … or to clobber with a weapon. I think it’s a clever clue, what with finding the ten-ace association in the answer.

  7. FOI 9D (next 14A, 24D, 4D), LOI 2D – of whom I had never heard!

    Took a bit longer than normal today, too much wine last night I think :)

  8. Ray said
    >>I liked 3d as 9d is used twice in it

    So does 6a.

    Nearly done. My favourite so far 21d. It was a while before the penny dropped. Sad that that word has that alternative meaning.

  9. All done. 26a is also a double 9d. I hadn’t heard of 2d either.

    Quite a fun puzzle today.

    Fond memories of the days DA starred in “Landlords & Anaesthetists”.

  10. All done except 2d, which I assume is themed, unless I’ve miscounted. That makes 26 possibilities, none of which I can make sense of. Hint appreciated.

  11. 2D is indeed themed. Def is ‘gun shearer’, ‘bloke’ gives letters 1 and 4.

  12. I must have the right t, as got this dn pat!

    6A & 26A indeed doubled theme, but 3D gets the guernsey for using both variants!

    Thought 2D unfair, who’d ever heard of this guy? Arthur C maybe?

    So all out, all understood, FOI 9D (best place to start), LOI 8A.

    Faves the two actresses!!! plus 3D, 12A & 15A!

    Happy solving!

  13. Thanks, Andrew T. I was puzzled about the shearer bit, because I’d found the right name as part of a US gunmaker. Should have known it would be more Aussie than that – my education as an ignorant Pom sheila continues!

  14. FOIs 4D/18D surprisingly as they were both themed and I got the idea before getting 9D. LOI 2D as I’d not heard of him. Favourites 26D and 3D because of the double application.

    Not as 10A as I first thought!

  15. Don’t beat yourself up, Mary! I’m Australian born and bred, lived here my whole life, over 60, but never heard of him.

  16. If only the clue for 2D had been ‘Yes, musician bloke’ I would have got it earlier.

  17. Tut-tut … all these people who have never heard of 2D. Subject of a lot of folk songs. There is a suggestion that he was the subject of the Bushwhackers hand-me-down song “One of the has beens”. We at CSIRO tried to do Guns out of a job by contributing to the invention of chemical shearing – but it could never match the guns and especially not JH. A Gun is quick and clean.

    Took me ages to see how 19D actually worked (I had 3 hours off) … very simple after that.

  18. Dom, it’s a type of knot. And it’s one of the 9d-affected clues. “Frayed” is an anagrind.

  19. Geoff M, I loved “Frayed knot”, an undeclared but possibly intentional homophone of ” ‘fraid not”.

  20. I think a more common 2D would be he of the first name Elias, inventor of the sewing machine.

  21. 20A is a bit of a cheat, PMc. The definition is the first 3 letters of the clue; it’s a verb. The item is themed.

  22. Back minding the grand baby
    I still can’t apply the theme even tho I have 9d… heeeeelp please

  23. Melanie, 9d is for the removal of what? You need to remove cries of it from those 18 words before the clue fits.

  24. I’m with Melanie. I got 9d right away and now many answers later (including some apparently themed ones), I still have no idea how to apply the theme.

  25. I am a marine biologist but still struggled with the dogfish clue in 20a. Now that I have it, all done. A hard slog today (at least for me).

  26. I’m working my way through. got 9D early in but it took a while to understand the theme!!

  27. Just getting started and have 9D but nothing else. And despite reading all the above have no idea how to apply it. I think I know 18D; ‘eat’ clues the first four letters, but can’t work out how the ‘parsnip pith’ fits in or where the last three letters come from.

  28. I laughed at the cool clue for 23A thinking it was not themed. Hope it’s not too early to be this specific but a new way For the young’uns To say they like something is to be “into-much”, minus the male! Great clue. But then I found the themed version and realised I’d over-thunk it. (I think I like my explanation better!)

  29. Couldn’t get to this yesterday. Printer not working, but worth the wait. Great theme.
    Favourite was the fawns in 26A. Misdirection in the definition. Fully-packed wordplay, double-whammy device, homophones and radio alphabet. Had it all.
    Last 2 in were 6A and 2D. Got stuck on trying to work in a word for simplistic lout in 6A, which threw out 2D.
    Have to admit I hadn’t heard of 2D either, despite having grown up in western Queensland and a grandfather in related work.

  30. Ian F re 10A
    4-letter “stake” (not a sharp piece of wood) “into” (inclusion) “hammered AND”.

    Hope that’s enough. If not, lead on, Virgil!

  31. correction, Ian F
    “bound” is the container indicator, “into” does not appear in 10A clue.
    Defn is 1st word, answer is a literary adjective.

  32. Can I get some guidance please, as usual I’m having difficulty solving DA Xwords which use a key clue (9d in this case) to apply to other clues. I can’t crack 9d , I think the definition is the last word.
    I have answers for some of the modified clues and can see what letters from 9d are inserted.
    I’m confused by the term “anagrind” used by contributors. when I google “anagrind” I find that it is short for anagram indicator.
    My question is the answer for 9d, an anagram of words in the clue ; an anagram of synonyms for the words in the clue or an anagram of a mixture of both ?

  33. IanS, puzzle not to hand, but 9D is a direct anagram from memory. But here’s a tip, “number” has two different pronunciations, the “b” is either sounded or silent. That should help you solve it in a flash!

  34. Thanks Witzend I’m working on the silent ‘b’ pronunciation
    I’ll have a look at straight anagram.

  35. IanS, a sweetener is something that sweetens. A whitener is something that whitens. So …

  36. Ian S.
    The answer is an anagram to give the last word. As indicated in the theme clue something is dimished if you apply 9d, i.e. 9d takes away certain elements of the themed clues. I’m sure you can operate this clue correctly.

  37. Thanks Margaret and GeoffM
    I had a doh moment I was thinking a specific name fo number rather than the category as Geoff M so rightly illustrates.
    I have been able to substitute the reaction to 9d for all but 4 of the affected clues before I retired at10:45pm I’ve just got back to mop up

  38. Found it pretty challenging this week – the second week in a row where I got done on a final clue that consisted of a four-letter name. I had earlier included 21D as a themed clue because it enclosed an incomplete word describing the action of 9D. I therefore had the 18 before 2D, and did not realise it was themed. Plus, my candidate answer of COVE can mean bloke, and has a sheep connection – a sheep station manager, in fact. Never mind!

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