DA Confusions for the 14/15th of January, 2011

Here’s where you have your questions answered, so fire away with your questions!

56 thoughts on “DA Confusions for the 14/15th of January, 2011

  1. Though I have the answer I’m confused about the wordplay in 16D. Is there a name for $5 that I don’t know? (The rest, except 9A were ok.)

  2. @Jonathon: I didn’t get the $5 wordplay, either, or 9A.

    I’m also stuck on 1D and 18A, and don’t get the wordplay on 22D.

  3. 1D is a canine ‘stroke’.
    18A is a Cockney clue – hence the H is dropped in speech, so HE become E added to another word sounding like a man?
    22D DOES are DEER (using DOE as a noun!). That reverses up (upset) to the copyright symbol.

  4. 9A is a fire opal. From the east apparently means run the word (hindu dress) backwards.

  5. Can’t help on 16D, and also at a loss on the wordplay for 17D.

    20D seemed obscure too, though not quite reaching the out-there-ness of 9A.

    Disappointed with 3D – had the wrong ending based on the definition for a while. And 24D seemed a better definition for another word beginning with the same letter.

  6. 16d: in = Chic, an, (v)ery. Just as $1000 can mean M, K or G, $5 can be shorthand for V

  7. “I am the very model of a modern major general”
    “… the stark hostility of the land itself, I’m sorry, the VERY land itself.” — Fred Dagg on the modern Australian novel.

  8. Conny -3D The first word is the definition,(albeit not a great one), the rest is in two parts. Vacuous refers to a word with the middle sucked out of it.

  9. Re 20 D: who is Painter Arp? Could he wear denim dacks?
    With 22D I seem to have a C to begin but I don’t know where it comes from in the clue?
    21D Is the Chinese gang a TONG?
    I think I have 14D correct but I don’t know how it works.
    I would really appreciate some help with these ones.

  10. Conny,
    20D – yes, first name JEAN – not a very good clue for mine – I had to google him to see if he existed.
    22D – the C is the ‘piracy symbol’ – the copyright c.
    21D – the gang is TRIAD.

  11. 14D – ‘fatter’ with wingers avoided, becomes ATTE. Put this around ‘injured’ 11-across.

  12. I have the linking letters for 18A, and understand the ‘cockney’ reference, but I’m still stuck. Got everything else, although I’d never heard of the advertiser in 1A and still can’t get the wordplay of 20A.

  13. Dave R :18A another word for ‘man’, it’s a tautology and a aural clue together with the cockney for HE = send
    Thanks for the 14D breakdown GB

  14. Dave R – 20A – ‘Boy, Jack, overcoming initial’ is just to replace the initial letter of BOY with J to give JOY. ‘Snags’ are STICKS.

  15. Can anyone please help me with 7D?
    I have various letters but can’t see how it works? and 27A looks as if it should be STEEL but it isn’t!
    Is 6D a really clunky audio clue?

  16. Conny – 7D is a ‘resentful’ expression that might be cried out. The expression itself forms the wordplay to give ‘HATRIPEDES’ as the answer. It’s one word ‘in’ another.
    27A sounds like STEEL and can mena the same as 16A.
    Yes – 6D is a really clunky audio clue!

  17. Thanks, Conny, GB and Jonathan. Snags = sticks?! Never watched Mad Men. Just got 18A, but surely it’s as much ‘receive’ as ‘send’.

    Conny, 7D is what a very 3D person might say to someone they hated. Think of another word for ‘tripe’ and whereabouts in the clue ‘tripe’ is. And yes, 6D is exactly that. You are close with 27A, but the clue says ‘by the sound’.

  18. Aha, I had just worked out 7D. It was quite cute! Thanks to both GB and Dave R.
    Now all I have left is 6A and 8D and I think 6A might be a simple Indian dish but I don’t understand how it works.

  19. 6D: What’s the point of “in the air”? The clue works fine as “Possibly pray for Socceroo skipper”.

  20. TT, surely “in the air” is necessary to signify the homophone? Neill/Kneel.

    19A: I have a minor quibble here. Why “get”? Surely “gets” or even “got” would have made the surface smoother (more grammatically correct)?

  21. 6a is hardly from Chennai; it’s a much more northern Indian dish.

    Jean Arp a very familiar name to me from high school art; I can’t believe so many of you hadn’t heard of him. On the other hand, I had to look up Lucas Neill and Steve Hooker. Generally, I find that if I don’t know some general knowledge from the crossie, then I probably ought to

  22. Thanks for the help on the Socceroo capt, Jonathan. I thought it was that word but didn’t know the name.

  23. Thanks for help with 1A….was part way there, but had never heard of him so didn’t know it was right! Still working on a few others. Conny, I think STEEL is correct! (sounds like something that means the same as 16A?)

  24. With 6A I can’t see how “a man” fits in in reverse [ repulsed] after the “yes” part is “repulsed”. Could anyone explain how this work works, please?

  25. Ian, between us we might know “everything”! I’d never heard of Arp, but Neill and Hooker are familiar names to me. However, I did initially go down the wrong path at first with the Hooker clue, with “pole dance” (thinking of a different “hooker”)! Re your comment on the Chennai dish, DA often uses a city to represent the country (eg Barcelona to represent Spain) and maybe that’s what he was thinking with the 6A clue. Not very appropriate, I agree.

    Other unknowns to me this week were Don Draper (I did watch the first 20mins of the first episode of Mad Men but that was a while ago) and, of course, girasol.

  26. I’m short one – 27A. I’ve got three out of five letters and a lot of words bouncing around in my head, but nothing seems to click with the wordplay. Hint please?

  27. Ooops, had mad a mistake with the last letter – forgot to change the D to an L in the down clue. Thanks, Jonathan.

  28. Thanks all for the helpful comments above, I have a slight quibble with 20d – I’d always known of him as Hans Arp – and coming from Alsace-Lorraine, I guess either would do. I spent a while thinking how Hans, or Arp, could be turned into trousers before it clicked. Should this ambiguity have been hinted at in the clue?

  29. I was disappointed on checking today’s paper to see that STEAL, not STEEL is correct…I found that clue ambiguous (rather like STUB/BUTS last week). I am hopeful of seeing an apology for the misprint tomorrow! However, on reading everyone else’s comments, it seems I am alone in this, and clearly need more practice!

  30. I wondered about that myself Jill and left it as STEEL when there was no ‘a’ for ‘it’s a steal’ but I was wrong!

  31. RC and I didn’t have a problem with that. I think we worked out that the homophone was for alloy, which meant that it’s cheap, however poor might be the grammatical mismatch, had to be the definition and the answer that gets written into the grid.

  32. I agree with AS. In figuring out whether it was steel or steal, I reasoned that the position of the homophone indicator “by the sound” clearly referred to “alloy”, so we were looking for a homophone of steel, not steel itself.

  33. I can’t find any help here for today’s (21st January). Is everyone on holidays? or has the format of this website changed so that it makes it difficult to find the latest clues. Today is a tricky crossword..

  34. Hi Kim, there should be the normal pair of topics along soon for this weeks puzzle. I think it needs one of the mods to start it off – I’m sure one will be along soon to get this week off the mark.
    Not finished yet but 1D is really needed to get the 12 answers twisted to put into the grid.

  35. Kim, the definition for 1D is a bit obscure (unless you live in Melbourne!)…at first I could only see the cryptic element….think a slang term for drunk, a reversed old Brit, and an anagram for the rest of the wordplay. If you are like me, the more relevant definition would be an 80s album title. Once you solve 1D the theme becomes obvious (but the puzzle is still damn hard!)
    If you are still struggling to get 1D I suggest you look at 10A, which is a pretty easy clue. If you get the answer there and see how it might “fit”, you may get the theme by working backwards.

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