DA Gold from 2/3rd of July, 2010

8 down: Celebrated red jelly after race meet (7)
Great direct definition disguise: jelly after race meet = ky after trots = Trotsky = celebrated red.

14 across: Clue not unravelled by breakfast patriarch (5, 4)
Another great direct clue: clue not unrivalled = uncleto by = Uncle Toby = breakfast patriarch.

13 across: Lite 18-down (in reach)? (5)
Another great one: lite = lo cal = local = in reach.

25 across: Black dog with frequent flyer points? (9)
A little easy, but good: black dog = jet setter = jetsetter = with frequent flyer points.

19 down: Where you may plunge into philosophical objective? (4, 3)
Clever: where you may plunge into = deep end = philosophical objective.

23 across: Bully boxes to be close, almost, to actor (5, 4)
bully boxes to be close, almost = cow boxes live end almost = Clive Owen = actor.

17 across: Giant dozer transport to glisten first off? (3, 6)
Nice one: transport to glisten first off = van twinkle first off = Van Winkle = giant dozer.

8 thoughts on “DA Gold from 2/3rd of July, 2010

  1. > 17 across: Giant dozer transport to glisten first off? (3, 6)
    > Nice one: transport to glisten first off = van twinkle first off = Van Winkle = giant dozer.

    Meh. For me this would be gold if it was “Long dozer”. “Giant dozer” feels wrong.
    Volume and length are different things. You don’t have “giant” naps or sleeps, you have long ones.
    And “Long dozer transport” provides just as nice a surface reading.

  2. Although “I had a giant sleep” sounds a little odd even though I’d understand the meaning perfectly, “I had a huge sleep”, for instance, doesn’t sound strange to me. People metaphorically move between length, volume and time effortlessly, and a good cryptic crossword’s currency is novel metaphor.

    “Long dozer” would certainly have been easier and more correct, but I don’t think “giant dozer” is incorrect.

  3. > a good cryptic crossword’s currency is novel metaphor.

    I agree. But this particular novel metaphor is jarring. That currency aint valid .
    (And yes, the clue was gettable despite that.)
    Of course, YMMV, but given your stated “sounds a little odd”, I don’t think it does vary.

    Being able to write clues that are fair AND clever AND hard AND have nice surface readings AND that don’t jar is a tad hard, I suspect – it’s much easier to be an editor/critic than a creator. :^) But that’s why good setters get paid the big bucks. ;-)

  4. Sadly, I don’t think the crossword setters on The Age at least get paid much at all.

    Seeing as the only reason I ever buy a newspaper these days is to do the cryptic, and I figure it’s much the same situation for a lot of people, they certainly deserve a greater wage than some hack.

  5. There is a giant sleeper in CS Lewis’s The Silver Chair – from memory I think he was Father Time. There is nothing in the Rip Van Winkle story to suggest that Rip is a giant but somehow I conflated the two figures in my own mind which helped me to get the answer to the clue. It is only reading MF above that I realised and indeed agree that “giant” is imprecise and potentially misleading.

  6. I’ve always loved this quote that Schopenhauer made referring to Kant:

    It is far easier to point out the faults and errors in the work of a great mind than to give a clear and full exposition of its value.

  7. Yes, these are mere quibbles. The fact that we are having this conversation at all is tribute to the intelligence that inspires it.

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