What I Couldn’t Quite Understand (6th February)

15 down: Lobsters can almost eat reddish one in pontoon (9)

I now realise I made a mistake on this one, putting in crustacia instead of crustacea. Either way, though, I’ve got no explanation for why can almost eat reddish one in pontoon = crustacea = lobsters.

16 across: European contrarily secure about a medium (7)

Here, European = latvian and via = medium. I don’t have much else, though.

7, 27 across: Philosopher cooked gourmet schnitzel, cut and prepared with cream core (9, 9)

Was this a mistake on DA’s part or have I just got something wrong? I had cooked = fried, gourmet = rich, schnitzel cut and prepared = nietzsch and cream core = e so that cooked gourmet schnitzel, cut and prepared with cream core = friedrich nietzsche = philosopher.

My issue: cream core should be ea, not e.

18 across: Lament route, oddly or French-ly! (3)

I just can’t make this one out cleanly. I can see route oddly = rue = lament, but what is the or French-ly there for?

16 thoughts on “What I Couldn’t Quite Understand (6th February)

  1. My issue: cream core should be ea, not e.

    Why? If it was ‘creamy’, maybe, but e is at the exact centre of cr e am.

  2. crustacea

    can almost = ca
    reddish = rust
    one in pontoon (the card game) = ace

    ca eats rustace = crustacea

  3. European contrarily secure about a medium

    contrarily secure = nail = lian
    a medium = a tv
    about = latvian

  4. I am writing to complain . This week’s DA was seriously unchallenging .We have to protest! I expect to spend a weekend mired in frustration and confusion not to have a quick squizz and then finish the whole thing 45 minutes later. Not good enough DA. (Maybe next week) It was still good fun though.
    P.S. I have to take issue with you over 6 across from January 30th:
    “8” is a cube, “27” is a cube, “64”is a cube and “die” is a cube. Hence 8,27 and 64 die = cubes. What’s wrong with that?

  5. Wow, now that was foolish of me. I just mistakenly read the middle of cream to be ea in a dyslexic moment. I can’t believe how stupid that was.

    Also, that reddish = rust I didn’t pick up, mostly because I didn’t think they could be synonymous terms.

    Anyway, thanks for the help jt, and welcome!

    And yep, this week’s wasn’t that hard and there wasn’t the same sense of accomplishment after taking him on, but I have to congratulate DA on the obscure letters.

    And I’ve come to around to your point of view on the cubes issue. Consider my error, not DA’s, corrected!

  6. English poet = Keats
    1-across = cover slip
    cover = top (first letter); slip = mistake

    So a mistake in the first letter of Keats gives us Yeats = an Irish poet

  7. And definitely an easy DA this week. I did like 18 – a three-way cryptic clue!

  8. Ah yes, 20 across is one of those everyone feels stupid having missed and which it seems DA hides better than most.

    Stuyvesant or Chesterfield boxes/lighters

    I wonder if I’ll be able to hear your groan from Canberra (I’m here for the week, sadly)

  9. Tried this as an occasional DS sample and not surprised some are saying “too easy”, though Mr Utzon and the alpine ash were new to me.

    Three quibbles:

    1D ‘highly’= UP is a bit iffy – any offers for a sentence where you can swap “up” for “highly” without changing meaning or producing nonsense?

    15 – “eat” in wordplay really needs to be “eats” (as typed by your explainer), which of course ruins the surface meaning. Unless there’s a form of “eat” which bridges the gap, this clue should have been rewritten.

    25 – “Display a sharp inclination” should be “Displaying a sharp inclination”, to match the right part of speech for STEEP. (Unless STEEP = “to be steep” in Oz-speak…)

  10. “an occasional DS sample” – I meant DA of course – as it happens, I tried a DS puzzle too.

  11. “Stuyvesant or Chesterfield boxes/lighters = torches”

    Thanks, AS. When all else fails I usually try to look for hidden words (backwards or forwards) but this time I forgot. Canberra is not so bad is it? I always enjoy my visits there (though short and infrequent).

  12. Well, the Phoenix Bar managed to take much of the dullness away.

    Canberra without the Phoenix would indeed have been a preposterous notion.

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